Saturday, January 02, 2010

Touch Or Don't Touch

This pelargonium often sails through the winter with no setback. The freeze in early December got it this year. This is a "don't touch" as in I will be looking at those dead leaves for at least 2 more months. Leaving the dead foliage will protect the underneath, healthy part of the plant should we have another freeze.

Another "don't touch", this pelargonium stands less chance of surviving since potted plants are at a disadvantage in a freeze. But I will let it go for now in hope of a little life being left in there.

The Walker's Low Nepeta has pretty much died back for the winter, it's usual routine. This is a "touch". Somebody should get out there and cut it back. New growth will begin to show soon. The pelargonium behind is in better shape than many in the yard as it is under a nandina and an ornamental pear.
"Don't touch"! I love the color of the bloom on this Lavandula pinnata buchii. So I'm really hoping it hangs in there. Living next to the Meyer's Lemon in the pot is to its advantage. The live parts are where the lights I put up for frost protection warmth on the lemon reached the lavender.
This lemon grass is getting on my nerves. I want the spot for other uses but here it is with some green, even with no frost protection. So it is a "don't touch" for the moment. But in about two months I will be attempting to divide it and move part to a better suited spot. My neighbor is hoping to get some too!

Most definitely a "touch". This solanum has seen it's last summer. While I love it (and have another planted last year in a more appropriate spot) it is just too much of a rampant grower for this space. I realized I was pruning it back every other week last summer. So....
the top is gone. Now to dig out the roots. I'm not looking forward to it. But I do have a Laurus nobilis waiting to take it's place.
In conclusion here is a society garlic that thought it should put out a bloom. It's a nice reminder that a walk in the garden, even on a dreary winter morning, can yield a sweet surprise!

9 comments:

Dee/reddirtramblings said...

Great info for those living in warmer climes.~~Dee

Anna/Flowergardengirl said...

You have lots more decisions than I do. We have more drastic measures here in my part of NC. The decisions are made for us mostly. If it's brown it goes.

Mr. McGregor's Daughter said...

I had no idea that gardeners in CA needed to think about whether to cut something back for the winter or leave it for protection. I can't remember what my Lavender looks like, as I can't even see it now for all the snow on it.

Carol said...

Great info. I like the concept of "touch" and "don't touch".

Kathy said...

I go through those decisions in early spring. But with different plants, mostly. I do have the nepeta & cut it back in earliest spring. This November was so mild I cut it back this fall.

Blackswamp_Girl said...

Neat post. I mostly "don't touch" until spring... fall/winter laziness, I guess! :)

MA said...

I clean up a bit here and there as I go and if I know it is no big deal to the plant. You will have some work in the spring, my friend!

Cindy McMorris Tournier said...

I feel for you! I have the same dilemma. Frostbitten plants that are easy to replace get whacked back here on my corner of Katy. That way I don't have to look at their pitiful remnants the rest of the winter.

donna said...

I can relate to digging out the roots of your solanum. It can be a big job. We have some red twig dogwoods that grow out of control. We prune them down to the ground, but then never get around to digging them out.